The Battle – Photos by USMC Photographer Douglas H. Page

Below are a series of photographs taken by USMC Photographer Douglas H. Page.

{ 170 comments… read them below or add one }

Richard Stoll April 9, 2014 at 9:06 pm

My Dad, Richard Stoll fought on Iwo Jima. His Sergeant was John Basilone. Dad is 94 this year 2014 and doing well at his age. My middle name is John. I’m named after John Basilone.

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Edith King March 28, 2014 at 9:27 pm

I am looking for anyone who may have information about my Grandfather who fought on Iwo Jima. Richard (Dick) Hutter Manzella, 5th Marine Division. He was a Ssgt or Platoon Sgt. He shipped out from Calif., He was married and had a daughter. I believe that he landed on the end of the island with Mt. Suribachi (sp?). His service #314432. He died in 1975 in El Cajon, CA. Thank you to all the brave Marines; yesterday, today and tomorrow. Semper Fi

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Joseph Miller March 17, 2014 at 6:14 pm

Does anyone have information on my father, George P. Miller “Cookie” a cook sergeant with the 4th Division. Died in 1966 when I was very young. He was 29 at Iwo

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JEFF COX March 14, 2014 at 8:16 pm

My Grandpa Draper David Overstreet was one of the unidentified men on the first flag raising,He has yet to be reconized for that,he was 2ed,Battalion 28th, marine,5th marine division,E,or F, Company,how do I get him reconized for theat

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Reg Gilbert March 12, 2014 at 1:56 am

Sgt. S. B. Gilbert wounded on Iwo March 2, evacuated March 3, 69 years ago, G – 2 -25

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Brian Faracy March 9, 2014 at 2:26 am

Thank God for the men of theUSMC. My Dad was in 3rd battalion
24th Marines. He was a machine gunner and was wounded on Iwo.
(Also wounded Saipan). Does anyone who was there remember Stephen J. Faracy?
He was from Brooklyn New York. Was he at the meat grinder w/ the
24th or wounded on the beach? My name is Brian Faracy
Bnskfaracy @aol.com. Thanks and may God Bless

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Bob Beattie March 3, 2014 at 5:49 pm

God bless these fine young men. My uncle, Sgt Jack Beattie was killed on Iwo 69 years ago. This is a tribute to him.

https://medium.com/p/59b999f17b44

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Harold Shadle February 24, 2014 at 1:22 am

Overwhelmed by the service of “Our Greatest Generation.” We must continue to share their stories with all who will listen. Our younger generations need to be aware that freedom is not free. Through those times in the past and the times ahead, we need to hold our country together and love one another regardless of race, color, or creed. May God bless all those who gave and continue to give for the greatest country the world has ever known!

Semper Fi!
Harold Shadle Jr.
Sgt United States Marine Corps (1978-1982)

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Ann February 23, 2014 at 3:34 am

Have found letters in my late mother’s possessions; from a Marine (Reserves) who was in the 4th Div. and who was killed on a ridge while flushing out enemy in caves, I believe…His name was Sgt. Harry McFall. Wondered if he had any
relatives who might read this. Thanks to all those young men who gave their lives to fight this and all the other battles of WWII…My uncle, John Mammone, also in the 4th, also fought on Iwo. He lived died in 1999. Never talked about the battle…

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Ricky February 20, 2014 at 2:06 am

Thank-you for all your stories and endeavors to find information. My prayers are with you. My dad, John Parthemore, recently passed away in 2003. He was a member of the “fighting 4th”, 24th reg, L company. At the time he was a sergeant. I believe when he was discharged he had become a corporal. Anyway, he used to talk about Iwo Jima a little bit, mostly it was to say that a lot of good men were sacrificed; among them one of his best friends, Corporal William Sheffield, who died on the very day the battle began, February 19, 1945. I think that day must have been a day that changed dad’s life forever because he always said that Sheffield died in his place. He was hit by a grenade. He died right at his side, so my father lived with the memory of that very violent moment for the rest of his life. I wonder if anyone out there was a member of his company.

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Dan Sweeney January 25, 2014 at 10:17 pm

My dad’s brother was wounded, shot through the lung and left for dead on the sands of Iwo until a sharp Navy Corpsman spotted blood pumping from his chest. I was told he was a half-track driver on the first wave. Always wanted to talk to him about it. Passed away several years ago. But I have a photo of him on his return with his medal on his uniform. Since then I think I have read everything out there on the battle of Iwo Jima.

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Jeff Molnar November 11, 2013 at 11:08 am

My uncle was gysgt kenneth englert, company k 3rd battallion 25th marines. KIA on Iwo Jima D day. He also recieved a silver star for valor on saipan.

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Allen Barker September 3, 2013 at 7:21 pm

My dad, Chester T. Barker was wounded on Iwo. I don’t know what division he was in. He retired as a Master Sergeant in 1957. Died in 1998 in Jacksonville, NC. I was in the Corps from 1954-1958. If anyone out there served with or knew my dad I would appreciate it very much to hear from you.
Semper Fi.

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Steve Keigley August 16, 2013 at 4:41 am

My dads younger brother, 2nd Lt. Louis Hayden Keigley, served with the 2nd Battalion, 28th Marines on Iwo. He was KIA on March 1, 1945 while leading D Company’s 1st platoon around the left (west) side of Hill 362A.

D Company’s 1st and 3rd platoons got caught in the crossfire between 362A and Nishi Ridge, were pinned down. He sent a runner to call in artillary, who got hit. He went out and tried to save the Marine and got hit by machine gun fire. He died on the field of battle.

3rd Platoon lost their leader, Lt. Herbert Worrey, in the same attack.

Maj. Gen. Keller Rockey, the 5th Marine Division Commander, sent Louis’s wife a hand written letter offering his condolences after the battle. The letter hung on my grandparents wall next to a Japanese officers sword which was given to my uncle by a combat vet before the battle of Iwo Jima.

Louis Keigley was 26 years old.

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Bob Morris December 1, 2013 at 3:12 pm

Steve, my uncle, James H. Morris, was a Sergeant in D Company, 2/28, 5th Marines! He was wounded in the arm on Day 18 by a sniper. By that time he had commanded his company as all of the officers and higher sergeants were wounded or killed. As he lay on the beach awaiting evacuation a buddy brought the sniper’s rifle and laid it on his stretcher as a souvenir saying they took it off the sniper’s body after he was killed. The evac personnel would not let the rifle on the boat so it was left on the beach. His partially regained use of the arm after many surgeries. He passed away in 1995. I recall him talking to my Dad, his younger brother a Guadalcanal Marine, bitterly about the Navy Brass. He felt they pushed the Marines way too hard thereby causing unnecessary casualties.
A side note, he was from Arizona and got acquainted with Ira Hayes at Camp Tarawa, who was in the flag raising picture from E company. Hayes was also from Arizona. Interestingly, he spoke to Ira a couple of times in Phoenix after the war. Ira visited the down town Phoenix bars and my uncle worked on the railroad in that same area.

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Eric Tilley June 28, 2013 at 2:25 am

Also, I have a photo of my father Jack Tilley and his rifle crew. You can’t see the A-4 machine gun hanging from his shoulder, but you can see the grooves it made in his flesh as they are all shirtless. Years after Iwo, I could still feel the “dents” that gun made in my Dad’s shoulders. But what you can see is the puppy my dad is holding as he’s chomping on a cigar! I’ll try to get it online soon. Imagine… a puppy surviving that hellhole and all those starving Japs!… God Bless!

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Eric Tilley June 28, 2013 at 2:10 am

My father JACK TILLEY of Wilmington, NC, also lied about his age and joined the 5th Mar. Div.when he was 17 to avenge his older brother GEORGE TILLEY who had been wounded in North Africa while serving as a combat medic.
Dad passed away in 1999. He was a machine gunner. Carried a modified Light Gun A-4 that they called a “Wildcat” (?) which was basically an A-4 with a rifle stock attached and the barrel may have been cut down a bit. Dad didn’t talk about Iwo much. Even in later years. But what he did tell me scared the living crap out of me and kept me out of the Service, I can tell you that!(Which was probably his intention.) He was in Sasebo for the occupation and was lucky enough to be stationed on a Navy ship in the Mediterranean during Korea. I have a Hammemari flag he took off a sniper and had his fellow Marines sign it. Right in the middle of the meatball is the signature of his Chaplain, “Father Bradley, New York, NY” We had the flag mounted for his 70th birthday. He passed away at 73 peacefully in his sleep as all great warriors should. He battled the demons that island placed on him as well as any man could be expected to. For that reason alone he deserves more medals than he received in combat. There were over 300 people at his funeral in 1999. So many were not as fortunate and never came back from that volcanic hell. He told me once that he owed it to the boys to do the best he could all the time. He was V.P. of Lavino Shipping at the NC State Port in Wilmington until he retired. He was also knighted by King Olav of Norway and named Norwegian Consul for the Port of Wilmington, an honor that was ended at that location when he retired. He was the best Dad EVER and the greatest friend anyone could ask for. His shoes will never be filled but we were so lucky to have him. He is eternally missed. All our heroes seem to be leaving us these days… but their shadows linger on.
God Bless and Semper Fi!!

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John Hanc January 2, 2014 at 8:11 pm

Eric, my uncle Anthony Comentale, originally from Queens, NY, was wounded at Iwo. After the war, he moved to Burgaw, N.C., which as you probably know is not far from Wilmington. I visited him down there in the summers. He opened a gas station there in the 1950s, that eventually became an auto parts store there that was in business for nearly 50 years. He died in December, 1996. I wonder if he knew your dad? My cousin (his son) still has all his medals, but little more. Although a garrulous and outgoing man, Uncle Tony didn’t talk much about his experience. Wonder if he knew your dad?

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John Armiger June 16, 2013 at 1:52 am

My uncle served in Iwo Jima in the Marine 5th and landed there on day one. He has since passed awawy but i am looking for some info on him or anyone who remember him. His name was George “Sarge” Zarcufski from Shenandoah, PA. Thanks in advance.

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Jim O'Connor June 2, 2013 at 9:57 pm

My Father PFC James J. O’Connor was KIA on Iwo February 21, 1945. He served in Company “K”, 3rd Battalion, 24th Marines, 4th Marine Divison. I would love to hear from anyone who served with him. I am also looking for his best friend that served with him and made it out. His name is John L. Oberdorf. Thank You!

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nancy v machin April 30, 2013 at 4:26 am

Working with Vets History Prog/LOC
An underage Seabee, Chuck Doubrava,
the Knight of the Black Pearl, on Iwo
1945 for one year. Know him? He lives here.
Nancy Aurora CO 80014

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Max Graf March 27, 2013 at 2:31 pm

Anyone with Company D, 1st Battalion, 23rd Marines?
My father-in-law, Robert Madill never wanted to talk much about it but we have a few mementos, his helmet etc. He would have been 18 yrs old at Iwo. We also have his hard bound copy of The 4th Div. book from camp Pen. He was in the CCCs at 16 (youngest in his group) before joining the Marines. From Somerville MA.

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Ken Clark March 21, 2013 at 4:31 am

Would appreciate hearing from anyone from 5th Marine Div., 2nd Batt. 28th Inf. My uncle Floyd served in this unit and was KIA on March 1, 1945. His name was Cpl. Floyd Vaughn Hallmark from Arizona. Thanks, Ken Clark.

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Steve December 14, 2013 at 1:55 am

Ken,

Your uncle, Corp. Floyd V. Hallamark, was in 2nd Lt. Louis H. Keigley’s 1st Platoon D Company. The Company roster shows he was awarded the Silver Star for his actions at Iwo.

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Steve December 14, 2013 at 2:36 am

Corp. Floyd V. Hallmark
1st Platoon
D Company
2nd Battalion
28th Marines
5th Marine Division

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Bart June 22, 2013 at 10:47 am

Ken,
My Cousin, Cpl James E. Hagstrom was with the 3rd Platoon, Company E, 2/28th Marines, and was also KIA the same day as your Uncle. Please let me know if you hear from anyone who was in Company E.

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M.Logsdon March 7, 2013 at 10:52 pm

Sorry to say GEORGE ALBERT BUCK Third Marines and veteran of Iwo Jima and Guam passed away on February 25th 2013 at age 97.George passed away on the same day he went into action on Iwo Jima February 25th…68 years later!..George was 28 years old when he enlisted in 1943 at Great Lakes Illinois.George was born June 9th 1915.George worked up until a few months ago at age 97! Pnuemonia and an intestinial blockage took him down.George got to go on the memorial flight to Washington D.C a couple years ago sponsored by the V.F.W…we lost another brave Marine…….

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Stuart Lebenbom March 6, 2013 at 11:22 pm

I had a chance to see these images and thousands more at the National Archives in College Park MD. I highly recommend scheduling some time and viewing the images.

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DOUG CARY February 28, 2013 at 6:01 pm

I WAS ON IWO WITH 62ND SEABEES ATTACHED TO 4TH MARINE DIV WAS ON IWO WHEN FLAG WAS RAISED GOD PROTECTED ME LOTS OF KILLING BOTH SIDES BODIES ALL BLOWEN APART

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JOHN R. March 6, 2013 at 10:40 pm

DOUG,

SEND ME AN E-MAIL, I HAVE INFO ON THE IWO SEABEES

JONATHON17PIM@AOL.COM

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DOUG CARY November 27, 2013 at 7:14 pm

SEND ME WHAT YOU HAVE JOHN TY

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Robert Tapio February 25, 2013 at 7:39 pm

My father, Louis P. Tapio, lied about his age and joined the corps when he was 17 with his buddy Charles Crazy Thunder. They were fresh off the Oglala Sioux Reservation at Pine Ridge, SD. He fought his way across the Pacific and turned 19 years old on March 8th at Iwo Jima. He was in the 27th FMF-PAC 5th Marine Division Tank Battalion as a LST operator. (He learned to drive a cattle truck as a teenager growing up on the reservation, so the Marine Corp gave him a job as a driver.) His buddy Charles was KIA on Iwo Jima. This young man was only 18 when he sacrificed his life for his country. Most American Indians are very proud of their country and they would be among the first volunteers to fight for it’s freedoms.When my Father passed away a few years back, I was going through some of his things and there was a photo of him kneeling down by a government issued headstone with his friend Charle’s name on it. It was at the Holy Rosary Mission Cemetery on Pine Ridge. I think about his story often, usually more during this time of year on the anniversary of the battle. Everyone should take the opportunity to thank ALL Veterans, or any person in uniform, anytime you see one, for the sacrifices each one of them have made protecting our freedoms.
I was born at Camp Lejeune, NC and my father & mother both instilled in their children a sense of pride in their country. At times, I never really appreciated the sacrifices that were made by these men & women, that give me the freedoms I enjoy today. In this day and age when you see those freedoms eroded by various groups in this country, that do not understand the sacrifices made by the generations before us, It makes me angry and sad at the same time. Angry because the ideals, values & truths of the country our fathers & mothers helped make for us is fading fast and sad because everyday we lose more & more of those precious people that provided us with that freedom.
Semper Fi & God Bless All Our Troops!
robert.tapio@boystown.org

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